The Scottish Cup – The World’s Oldest National Trophy


The Scottish Cup is the oldest national trophy in the world and was contested in season 1873-74. Queen’s Park beat Clydesdale in the final  at Hampden Park (Scotland’s national stadium) on the 21st March in front of a 2500 crowd. Goals by Mackinnon and Leckie in the 60th and 80th minute respectively thrust Queen’s Park into the history books.  The Referee was James McIntyre.

On the 19th May, 2012, Edinburgh rivals  Hibs and Hearts  played in the final at Hampden Park , the first time the clubs have met in a Scottish Cup Final since 1896. It was Hibs 12th final and Hearts 14th.

Heart of Midlothian FC logo.svg

Hearts Football Club was formed in 1873 (or 1874 – the date is disputed)  by a group of friends from the Heart of Midlothian Dancing Club.  The traditional story is that the group of friends bought a ball before playing local rules football at the Tron from where they were directed by a local policeman to the meadows to play. The club took its name from the Heart of Midlothian jail,which was demolished in 1817 but was kept fresh in the mind by Walter Scott’s novel The Heart of Midlothian.  They play at Tynecastle Stadium and are nicknamed the Jam Tarts or the Jambos.

Hibernian Football Club was founded in 1875 by Irish immigrants. Although the demographics of the area has changed, it has kept its heritage in its name, badge and colours.  They play at Easter Road and are nicknamed the Hibees. Its name Hibernia is derived from Hibernia, the Roman name for Ireland. They were the first British team to compete in Europe after Alan Hardaker persuaded Chelsea, the English champions, not to enter that year.

To commemorate the final, the SFA produced a programme with a photo of the original 1896 final

Scottish Cup Final 2012.jpeg

And here’s the final result.

Hibernian   1-5     Hearts

Man of the match – Rudi Skacel (Hearts)

Referee – Craig Thompson

Attendance – 51, 041

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4 comments on “The Scottish Cup – The World’s Oldest National Trophy”


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